Would you like your new armchair in vintage leather or reclaimed aircraft?

How can end-of-life ships be decommissioned while recycling most materials and protecting the environment?
Veolia Group

Would you like your new armchair in vintage leather or reclaimed aircraft?

How can end-of-life ships be decommissioned while recycling most materials and protecting the environment?

A new lease on life for the mythic Jeanne d’Arc training ship

More than 1,000 ships are sent to ship-breaking yards across the world each year. Many of these vessels are decommissioned under conditions inconsistent with environmental good practices.
How can end-of-life ships be decommissioned while recycling most materials and protecting the environment?
In the French city of Bordeaux, Veolia is decontaminating, dismantling and recycling a 181-meter ship that was once a symbol of the French navy: the former Jeanne d’Arc. Ninety percent of the 9,000 metric tons of steel, electronic and electric equipment, and various other materials will be recycled and transformed into new objects.

This unparalleled project marks the launch of Veolia’s new dismantling program in France.

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The goal is to recycle 97% of the materials from 317 passenger cars each 25 m in length and weighing more than 30 metric tons. This is the first project of this scale in France.
In the Gulf of Mexico, more than 3,800 platforms are scheduled to be decommissioned in the coming decades. Veolia is gearing up for this new challenge.